drdiy

Preparing Your Home From Heat Loss

In Winter Tips For Your Home on January 3, 2012 at 3:48 pm

If your chimney flue has not been cleaned recently and you use the fireplace weekly, have it cleaned to prevent a chimney fire. Also, examine the firebox for loose or crumbling bricks. Make any necessary repairs using fire clay, which is a heat resistant mortar. Take a look at your chimney from the outside. If ivy or tree limbs are near the top, cut them back. If you have loose or missing bricks, have them repaired or replaced before you use your fireplace.

Most fireplaces built since 1990 have dampers just above the firebox that close off the flue to limit heat loss when it’s not in use. Make sure the damper is not damaged by age or stuck open (or shut) because of fallen debris. Call in a chimney sweep for major problems. They should be able to make a “clean sweep” of anything wrong.

If your house has a crawlspace make sure you’ve closed all the vents. Also, if you have little or no insulation in the crawl, add R30 insulation to the perimeter walls, a vapor barrier (generally 4-6 mil plastic) should be covering the dirt ground of the crawlspace. And finally, insulate all plumbing pipes with insulation or pipe wrap.

Does your house have a whole-house fan in the hall ceiling? Install a plastic vapor barrier on top of it and then cover it with insulation to prevent heat loss. The heat loss through those louvers is considerable. One problem I find when inspecting houses is some families don’t seal the whole-house fan, which causes rotting and mold in the attic to the roof sub-structure. That is not good.

If you total up all the areas around the average house that need caulking and weatherstripping, you’re looking at an equivalent of a three-foot gaping hole in the wall. Weatherstripping consists of those slim strips of rubber, plastic, metal and foam that seal the moving edges of doors, windows and other areas. To stop air leaks, weather stripping has to make a good seal between the door or window and its frame.

Storm windows not only protect the main window from water, winter, rain and snow, they slow heat loss by creating a dead-air space, however, only if they are tight enough to limit air movement. Make sure storms fit snugly all around the window frame, leaving only small weep holes along the bottom edge to allow condensation, rain and moisture vapor to escape. Loose storms are not only ineffective, they promote frost on the indoor window surface.

Pipes, vents, hatches, recessed lights, and cracks that penetrate the upper floor ceilings are easy avenues for heat loss. Even more important, they allow moisture vapor to migrate to the attic, where cooler temperatures cause it to condense into water that saturates insulation and freezes into frost. Close off large penetrations with plywood or wallboard, then seal all joints and cracks with caulk.

If you think you have “bats in the belfry” what do you have up there? You’d better make sure you have good attic ventilation. In an insulated attic, the rafters and roof boards are cold. Any warm, moist air reaching them through the insulation immediately condenses into moisture. The moisture gets trapped and eventually rots the wood. So whenever you add attic insulation, make sure you have good attic ventilation. To see how much insulation and ventilation you need, go to my website at www.technihouse.com and click on “Insulation: Packing It In”.

If a winter storm strikes, close off those rooms that are not absolutely essential. Listen to TV and radio for weather developments. Letting faucets drip a little may prevent freezing damage. If a power failure occurs, turn off most light switches, your furnace switch, and unplug the freezer and refrigerator. The surge of returning electrical power can damage the motors of appliances.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: